Goddess


By Keith Schengili-Roberts (Own Work (photo)) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

Isis From A Painted Shroud at the Metropolitan Museum Of Art. Photo By Keith Schengili-Roberts (Own Work (photo)) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Isis is the Mother Goddess of ancient (pre-Islamic) Egypt, not a bunch of murderous women hating villains running around in Asia Minor, raping and pillaging. Wake up American media, you are insulting the embodiment of the divine feminine. In Europe much of the media refers to this group of sewage dregs as ISIL. President Obama vacillates between ISIL and ISIS.

Isis was known in ancient Egyptian religion as the Mother Goddess. Isis was both the wife and sister of Osiris. Because she resurrected Osiris, who had been killed by his brother Set, Isis was considered “more powerful than a thousand soldiers” and “the clever-tongued one whose speech never fails.” Isis was revered for her role as the mother of Horus, one of Egypt’s most powerful gods. She was also the symbolic mother of every Pharoah of Egypt, and all of Egypt itself.

For further information on the story of Isis, Osiris and Horus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osiris_myth

On the other hand, the members of the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant have murdered and raped women and children with no compunction whatsoever. They have no respect for the divine feminine. One of my remote viewing teachers and the founder of the SchwartzReport, social commentator Stephan A. Schwartz sums the situation up neatly as follows:

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In answering the comments on the previous post, I was reminded of an amazing cat story in which I participated briefly. This happened in New York City’s East Village circa 1990. A woman, an artist, who is now deceased lived across the hall from me with her husband and a cat named Bass. It was a sixth floor walk-up with an elevator that sometimes worked. I did occasional readings for the woman in exchange for a glass of wine. We were sort of friends. I had a special relationship with the cat and would read him from time to time by petting him and mentally asking him questions, to which he would answer directly to my mind very clearly. I would convey this information to the woman, who would then generally do what the cat required.

One evening the woman told me how the cat had come to live with her. It was a cold winter night as she made her way home. When she got a few steps from the doorway of the tenement, she became aware of the cat meowing pitifully behind her. She bent down and petted his shivering body, promising to bring him a can of cat food when she got up to her apartment to fetch it. I think the woman had once had another cat that had passed on some years previously and she remembered the lingering can in her cupboard.

She unlocked the two bullet-proof glass doors that separated the January chill from the steam heat. The elevator worked that evening and sped her to the sixth floor. After unlocking the door to her tiny home, she put down her handbag on the kitchen table and fetched the promised can from the cupboard and headed back to the door of her apartment two steps away with the intention of bringing down the cat a nice supper.

Imagine her surprise when upon opening the door who ran into her apartment but the very cat! She hadn’t let him in and he wasn’t in the elevator with her, so it was rather mysterious how he had gotten in and found her door on the sixth floor so quickly. But it was clear that the cat was at home so she allowed him to stay, especially since her husband, a musician, was out of town on a gig.

Several nights later when her husband was still away, the woman had a startling dream, almost a nightmare, that filled her with awe. The cat came to her in a realistic dream as a giant cat-headed figure larger than a human, and in a deep and resonant voice that shook her body, proclaimed, “I am Bass!” or at least that is what she heard. So naturally she called the cat Bass. And Bass became an accepted member of the household.

Now the woman, an artist, as I had mentioned previously, was an intelligent college educated person, but apparently never studied any ancient Egyptian mythology, because when I asked her if she was certain that the cat in her dream said Bass and not BAST she looked at me blankly and said something like, “I think so, what difference does it make?” I found it remarkable that she had never heard of BAST.

BAST is/was the protector Goddess of lower Egypt, where cats were worshipped and none so much as BAST. She is a glorious cat-headed woman in some renderings while in others a proud lioness or an elegant cat. The town of Boubastis in the Nile Delta was her sacred place.

Now the problem with this whole story is that BAST is a Goddess and Bass was a male cat, yet I feel sure that the woman had a visitation from the Goddess BAST. I told her so and though she mulled it over in her mind, I remain unconvinced that she was duly impressed with the divine encounter she had been privileged to receive.

Several months later, it came out in a reading that the woman and her husband would be moving to California. She requested I ask Bass if he would be pleased with the move. I held the cat on my lap and questioned him. He was alarmed. He did not want to go under any circumstances. A couple of months later they moved to LA taking Bass with them, in my opinion, against his will. About two weeks after the move, I found out later, the cat got out of the house and was promptly run over.

BAST (courtesy of Wikipedia Commons)

Horrible animal slaughter in the name of religion!  This is a brutal and inhumane custom that brings shame on all those that participate. To kill harmless animals in the name of God is an abomination. This mass slaughter runs counter to Hindu principles of reverence for life. I try to be very open minded about the beliefs of others but this just makes me sick. I can’t see any bright side to this whatsoever.

I commend the actress and animal activist Brigitte Bardot for standing up for animals.

‘WORLD’S BIGGEST ANIMAL SACRIFICE’ BEGINS
By Deepesh Shrestha
AFP
November 24, 2009

Up to a million Hindu devotees have gathered in a village in Nepal to
witness the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of animals in a mass
sacrifice that has drawn widespread criticism.

Worshippers travelled long distances, many coming from India, to attend the
two-day Gadhimai festival, which honours the Hindu goddess of power and
takes place once every five years in southern Nepal.

A huge cry of “Long Live Gadhimai!” went up after the village temple’s head
priest launched the event with the ritual sacrifice of two wild rats, two
pigeons, a rooster, a lamb and a pig.

The crowd then rushed to a nearby field where 250 sword-wielding butchers
were waiting to begin the mass slaughter of about 20,000 buffalo, brought by
devotees to be sacrificed near the holy temple.

“This is a very special day for Hindu devotees,” head priest Mangal
Chaudhary Tharu told AFP as the Gadhimai festival began.

“All the people who came here to worship Gadhimai have been waiting a long
time for this day. I am very proud to be part of this event,” added Tharu,
the fourth generation of his family to serve as a priest at the temple.

An AFP reporter at the scene said up to a million devotees were crammed into
the area for the festival. Many were from India, where some states have
banned animal slaughter for religious purposes.

Mahesh Yadav, a Nepalese farmer who arrived at the site with a black goat
tethered to the back of his bicycle, said he wanted to thank the goddess for
giving him a son.

“I had seven daughters in a row so I promised the goddess I would sacrifice
a goat if she gave me a son,” he told AFP.

“Eight years ago the goddess listened and my son was born.”

Nepal’s government has refused to put a stop to what it says is a
centuries-old religious tradition, despite a vocal opposition campaign from
local animal rights activists who say the slaughter is needless cruelty.

Their cause is supported by the well-known Indian animal rights activist
Maneka Gandhi and by the French film star turned campaigner Brigitte Bardot,
who this month wrote to Nepal’s president urging him to put a stop to the
festival.

Armed police have been deployed around the temple grounds and there were
fears of clashes between animal rights activists and festival-goers.

But the campaigners appeared to have stayed away after making a last-ditch
appeal to the government to stop the event over the weekend.

The buffalo slaughter took place in a huge field surrounded by three-metre
wall, and will be followed on Tuesday by the ritual sacrifice of around
300,000 goats, sheep and birds.

Many festival-goers scaled the wall to get a better view of the killings,
carried out by volunteers using specially-built bamboo cages to prevent the
animals from escaping.

Jaya Lal Thakur, a 34-year-old local barber, said he paid 210 rupees ($4.90)
for a licence to work at the festival and had already slaughtered dozens of
buffalo.

“This is the second time I’ve slaughtered buffalo at the Gadhimai festival.
I don’t get paid to do it but I believe it will bring me salvation,” he told
AFP.

“This is a rare opportunity and I’m very happy to be a part of it.”

At one point police used batons to disperse the crowds and prevent a
stampede, an AFP reporter witnessed, but there were no casualties and the
event appeared mainly peaceful.

Nepal’s government has provided 4.5 million rupees ($105,510) in funding for
the festival, a lucrative event for organisers, who sell the hides to
contractors after the slaughter.

The meat is distributed among local people, some of whom set up stalls
selling sweets and drinks.

Authorities have banned the sale and consumption of alcohol in the area, but
reports said five people including one Indian national died at the weekend
after drinking home-brewed alcohol.

————

My recommendation is to go to the Nepalese Embassy website and complain vociferously: http://www.nepalembassyusa.org/contact.php

Anil Bhanot speaks out in the Guardian:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/belief/2009/nov/25/gadhimai-animal-sacrifice-nepal

Another article from the Guardian:   http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/nov/24/hindu-sacrifice-gadhimai-festival-nepal

img_0653“Our Mother, whose body is the Earth, Sacred is thy being. Thy gardens grow. Thy will be done in our cities, as it is in nature. Thanks be this day for food, and air, and water. Forgive us our sins against Earth, as we are learning to forgive one another. And surrender us not unto extinction, but deliver us from our folly. For thine is the beauty, and the power, and all life, from birth to death, from beginning to end. Amen. So be it. Forever. Blessed be.”

~Henry Horton

Lauren Raine Speaks in Sacred Circle.

Photo of Lauren Raine by Fahrusha

From April 13 thru April 16th, I was privileged to assist at Lauren Raine’s Masks of the Goddess seminar on the beautiful campus of the Kirpalu. I roomed in a nice facility called Hill House which was about a quarter mile away from the main building. Spring had just barely begun to bloom with the first tender blossoms and here and there, there were tiny patches of snow. The weather was crisp and splendid; the first scents of the awakening Gaia could be detected.

I was frankly very tentative about the idea of a roommate. I was glad to have company but as a light sleeper, I was afraid I’d be disturbed. To my surprise my roommate turned out to be a truly amazing woman named Martha (last name withheld to protect the innocent). She was a tough, strong, yet tender older lady who impressed me more than anyone I’ve met in a long time. Her honesty and wisdom were beyond that of many self-styled spiritual leaders, and here knowledge of nature and survival skills was formidable. We had some very valuable conversations.

The plaster casts that formed the masks

Lauren’s class had seven participants, all female. I guess guys mostly don’t want to make a Goddess mask, go figure. It is their loss. 🙂 The participants had come from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire and Ontario and included several dedicated craftswomen, a yoga teacher/actress, a midwife, a retired ballerina current yogini, a business woman philanthropist and a housewife.

One participant even wrote me a poem:

Often quiet, often silent
Often wanting to be free
Flying high above the trees
Telling what there is to see…
Bringing visions of the goddess
To the circle at our feet
With her face in white of plaster
She was also filled with laughter..
Sometimes rosey, sometimes pink
Sometimes she would stop and think
Shall I paint this mask of mine?
No, not now, another time…
So we all have since then parted
Going this and that way farther
Towards the goddess of our dreams
and moisturize our mask with cream…
Beatriz Rodriguez
Wow! What an honor. Thanks so much. Thanks to Lauren and Kirpalu and all participants that I could be part of this sacred and cultural event.

Gaia Mask

Above: Mask of Gaia by Lauren Raine

Do you want to have a creative mini-vacation this Spring? Are you interested in exploring the feminine side of the divine? Have you always imagined yourself as Venus or Nu’ut? Ishtar, Freya, Saraswati, Pele or Selu?

This April you can live out that creative dream at THE KRIPALU CENTER FOR YOGA AND HEALTH in the Berkshires (Massachusetts) by attending Lauren Raine‘s Masks of the Goddess: Maskmaking, Ritual and the Goddess Within. Lauren is a wonderful artist and great spirit, who I’ve known for many years. She is dedicated to the concept of the divine feminine and the Gaia Principle.

You will be able to create your own mask and relate to it through ritual. The experience of making a mask is creative and spiritually nourishing and dates back centuries in a variety of cultures the world over.

The dates are:
April 13 – 16, 2008 (Sunday – Wednesday)

For information By Phone: 800-741-7353